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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 812 (some duplicates have been removed)
to celebrate britain's economic success. he talked about economic success. new jobs, higher wages, greater opportunities for people to make something better for themselves and for their families. it became known as the speech where he declared, "you've never had it so good." now, today in bedford, in britain as things are, they feel very different. small-business people are working harder than ever before. people are working harder than ever before, but for far too many, wages are falling, and prices are rising. they feel worse off, not better off. far from feeling they have never had it so good, millions across britain today fear they will never have it so good again. and the question that people ask me is how will we turn this around? and that is what i have come to bedford to talk about, because i think it starts with a truth that we have forgotten as a country, that economic recovery will be made by the many, not just by a few at the top. britain needs great, successful, big-business leaders. it needs them to feel rewarded and supported, but they know better than anyone that they canno
. and at a time when the britains are debating whether to leave the european union, they are still poised to become a full member. hello. british prime minister david cameron will be visiting india in the coming days. he is still traumatized by the gang rape of a student just before christmas, who later died of her injuries. it is about indian attitudes towards women, but they also look at how it runs itself. many are accused of rape, murder, and other serious crimes. andrew north reports. >> it was an eruption that many believe was waiting to happen. the new delhi rape case has unleashed a torrent of anger at the old order, bringing a darker side of that democracy to light. the government is promising speedier trials and tougher laws. the suspected criminals this activist is investigating, he says the politicians are evading justice. >> our judicial system, it takes such a long time. they have been in the seat of power, where they can delay cases not just for years, but for decades. >> we have come to the indian heartland. it is one of the engines of indian politics, controlling the most
in the hopes for it -- arrived for the beginning of a three day tour. >> britain is one of the largest investors in india. i think the basis for that special relationship is there. >> back in town, hugo chavez announces his plans for the future of the country after cancer surgery. london fashion week is now in full swing. we will be seeing what is in this year. hello, welcome. david cameron says that the u.k. can forge one of the great partnerships of the 21st century with india. this is his hope as he begins his trade mission. john joins us live from mumbai. there he is. what kind of a profile is this? >> david cameron is hoping that he would get a high-profile welcome to the gateway of india behind me. there hoping that this will be a huge increase in british trade. even the chief executive. david cameron has a clear mission, he wants to double the trade that takes place between britain and india but point to 15. that is what this is huge cast of characters already in talks with business groups throughout all sectors. from retail to banking, they are hoping to do some business while
today. his visit to britain 2010 is remembered with great respect and affection. pope benedict's message on that visit of working for the common good is something that's of to our whole country and i'm sure his success will continue to provide a voice of inspiration for millions around the world. >> president obama and first lady michelle obama also released a statement, saying -- pope benedicta is 85 years old and has served in his position since 2005. he becomes the first called in over 600 years to resign. >> you might expect given the breadth and depth of products that we have, smart phones and tablets, one of the concerns is maltese craine connectivity. your couch watching tv, but also texting on your found, are also on the internet on your tablet or something like that. how do you link those devices to each other? how do we also link them to the clout or to the internet? one good example is the gallick seek camera. the the -- the galaxy camera. it is built with 3g and 4g connectivity. you can take photos and immediately applied them to a website or asocial media service. it brings
passengers who flew between amsterdam and croiden which is where most of the battle of britain was coordinated. in fact, king george vi trained here as a pilot. now it's a museum in the middle of an industrial estate. but the alfewer to adapt, it was literally grass fields, meant a close after the war to be replaced by an r.e.f. facility in west london called heathrow. other large airports also developed around the capital, notably gadwick, but they aren't hubs because all passengers using those airports start or end their sunny journey there. heathrow, like it or loath it, is britain's only true hub airport where travelers can connect with flights to almost anywhere in the world. but as most people will agree, heathrow's now full and its owners are screaming out for permission to build another runway. so the fifth major review since the 1960's into airport capacity in the southeast is now under way. although it won't report until late 2015, it could sut expanding at heathrow or gad wick or even building a completely new hub airport. so while london dithers i wanted to find out
28 economies britain has been 18th out of 24 growth? >> first of all let me say on high-speed rail come which goes right through the middle of the chancellor's constituency, we are proud of the fact it i is a this government has taken the decision to invest. just as this government that is building crossrail which is the biggest construction plan anywhere in europe. he asked about other european economies. the fact is if you listen to the european union, the oecd, or the imf, they all point out that britain will have the fastest growth of any major economy in europe's -- in europe this year. but i have to ask them, what is his plan? we all know. it is a three-point plan. more spending, more borrowing from more debt. exactly the things that got us in the mess in the first place. >> i have to say we've gotten used to that kind of answer. he promises, he promises a better tomorrow, and tomorrow never comes. that is the reality. and he couldn't deny the fact that we're 18th out of 20 country. were done worse than the u.s.a., worse than candidate, worse than germany, worse than france b
>> this is "the journal." moody's slaps' britain with a ratings downgrade. oscar pistorius is free on trail ahead it is free on bond ahead of the trial for murder. it is time for this year's oscar ceremony. just as it seemed europe was making big strides in solving its debt crisis, moody's has announced it is slashing its top credit rating, the first time britain will lose its aaa status since 1988. moody's says it has downgraded it because the economy is likely to stay sluggish the next few years. the news comes as an unwelcome surprise in london, especially for the finance minister who says the downgrade has made him more determined to cut the public debt. >> moody's lowered the rating by one notch. it is a blow to the government. some analysts say the austerity policies are hurting the economy at a time when it needs stimulus to generate growth. the finance minister sees things otherwise. >> this is a reminder of the debt problems britain faces and the clearest warning to those who think we can run away from dealing with those problems. >> britain has struggled to reduce its deb
britain. before that, australia had 12 mass murders in a 12 year period. it takes a few years to work but it absolutely works and that was the point that i was trying to get across today. >> you got it over and it is the reality check that people need. these are killing machines that belong in military scenario nothing to do with civilian life. >> i appreciate the time. >> thank you for joining us. there are millions screaming no gun control that it will make america less safe. joining me is mr. lott. you heard compelling testimony from neil hesslan and the doctor graphic detail on the hill today exactly what these weapons can do. is your belief still that the only answer to america's gun violence is more guns? >> well, i think we all want to try criminals from going and getting guns and the question is what is going to work and what is going to make the situation worse off. the doctor's discussion was moving but misleading. rather than classifying things as handguns versus assault weapons. if he wants to go and talk about hunting rifle that can do the same type of damage to use terms
, some people prefer to watch the world in black and white in britain. nearly 60,000 people killed in syria after two years, we finally might be looking at some diplomatic progress. for the first time, the president's chief ally, russia, with the help of the syrian national coalition, the foreign minister spoke to us on the sidelines of the security council meeting in munich. he says he wants to keep in regular contact with syrian opposition. iran is another staunch ally of the syrian president. after the 45 minute meeting, they talked about a way to remove the regime with the least possible bloodshed. there has been serious opposition to the presence of government subject to the condition including 160,000 prisoners. we will go live from munich, lots to talk about already. we have the defense minister weighing in with his own views. what did he say? >> that is right, syria has remained high on the agenda here on sunday morning. the conference heard from another key regional player, he told the conference that in his view the fall of a sought -- assad was imminent and would deal a
's coming up in the next half-hour -- a meeting in brussels debates the future of mali. >> britain's parliament votes on a same-sex marriage fell in a debate which threatens to split the conservative party. >> and the dangers of cyber- bullying. how one group is trying to teach young people to avoid becoming a victim of bullying online. we begin this program in mali where secular toric forces -- tuareg forces say they have taken hold of the last segment held by rebel forces. >> those mnla fighters told reporters that islamists had abandoned the area. the rebel group began a separatist insurgency in the north of mali last year. it was later hijacked by al qaeda-linked islamists. >> we are joined live from mali by our correspondent. could we say this is the end of the islamic threat or the beginning of a protracted guerrilla war? >> it is difficult to say because although the french, malian an dnow tuareg soldiers have taken population centers, aide from the few militants that have been captured, the majority have just disappeared into a large desert area in the north. >> you are say
on public at telik -- public television in america and also around the globe. britain most -- britain's most senior catholic has thrust the succession plans into question. cardinal keith o'brien has stepped down after being accused of inappropriate behavior with priests. he was due to take part in the conclave to elect the successor to pope benedict, but will now not be going to rome. our religious correspondent has the details. >> for a decade and more, he has been one of scotland's biggest personalities and strongest voices. then came allegations that cardinal o'brien behaved inappropriately towards four priests in his care during the 1980's. suddenly, he is out of office. today, cardinal o'brien stayed behind closed doors. in a statement, he acknowledged his poor health, but made no attempt to rebut the allegations against him. instead he said, for any good i have been able to do, i thank god. for any failures, i apologize to him all whom i have asked to all whom i have -- i apologize to all whom i have offended. a few days ago, he was the catholic church's elder statesmen, due to fly to
, they had legislation in australia, and great britain, and after that, australia has had no mass murders. it takes a few years to work, but it absolutely works. and that was the point that i was trying to get across today. >> well, you got it over incredibly powerfully and i was so glad you did what you did. because it is the reality check that people need. you know, this is not a game. these are killing machines that belong in military scenarios, nothing to do with civilian life. dr. begg, thank you for joining us, i appreciate it. >> i appreciate the time. >> many americans are demanding stricter gun controls, and many are screaming absolutely not. believing it will make crime worse and america less safe. joining me, the author of "at the brink." you heard the very compelling testimony from not least, neil heslin who lost his son from sandy hook, and dr. begg, revealing in very graphic detail upon the hill today exactly what these weapons can do. and is your belief still that the only answer to america's gun violence is more guns? >> well, i think we all want to try to keep criminals f
dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than turning the superstate tendencies have these are given institutional expressions in the economy because as in europe the prevailing convictions across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our response a devotees and obligations to our fellow citizens that such obligations might be realized outside of the realm of politics doesn't occur to large numbers of the european political leaders i would have to say of a considerable number of european politicians. in this regard i often wondered why it would be an important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because to go about the new world, democracy in america wasn't written for an american audience. the top bills intended audience was europe. so i expect it would be astonished to learn how they don't need problems would be beyond individual capacity to address but also resolved by things like trade. 19th century americans addressed these problems in the habit of the freeze association instead
to churchill's discuss the british gas loved as chicken was rationed in britain except for churchill, did not like his chicken messed about with. one quick word, she cooked with the churchill family in the 1930s and moved with her children to downing street and stayed with a family until 1953. when churchill was again prime minister. she was a superb and more important unflappable coke. she knew what church like and cooked it unlike mrs. nazareth. despite the bombing of london and ever-changing plans she took care of churchill and called that her, quote, work. churchill did not fall far from the tree. his mother, the charismatic jennie jerome born in brooklyn, new york had been a much admires society hostess in london. she was famous for inviting non-political many to dinner and ceding them to facilitate discussion. the left no cut with uncooked. churchill must learn from her early on how to manage dinner for his own purposes. in the book i described how he deployed to this attention to detail. at his birthday party dinner in tehran in 1943 he arranged the seating himself. he had his sapp
enough to convince the catholic church, the church of england, the muslim council of great britain and others to say, ok, that is fine, go ahead. that is one of the reasons there was a pretty huge rebellion in the governing conservative party today. more conservative mps voted against this proposal then in favor. it was only possible for it to get past because there was an effective alliance between the labor party and the opposition and less than half of the conservative party, and also the governing liberal democrats as well. whatever the results politically, this is a real headache for a prime minister who thought this was possibly an easy win to look like a modern, open, younger sort of prime minister and now finds himself at war with a large part of his own party. >> what does this say about how much in england and wales have changed? >> it is a dramatic change. i saw the report that i did for the bbc tonight. i dug through the archives at the bottom by producers did. 45 years ago when for the first time it was decided that the doctor, such road you would not be illegal, it pi
think the reason was the sense of urgency communicated to him by developments within britain and europe-- in germany where hitler had come to power, in the united states where revolution was in the air, and in other parts of europe and in britain, too, where the intellectual class was rapidly moving to the left. he felt he had an answer that was superior to marx as to analyzing capitalism's discomforts, an answer that was not only superior, but much more congenial to him for handling it. john maynard keynes is a truly memorable figure of the 20th century. he married a ballerina, ran an insurance business, and wrote a treatise on mathematical probability. but first and foremost, he was a teacher. the imagination he showed made... his ability to associate something he found interesting with something that had been said that by itself was uninteresting... it just stood out. you were in semishock listening to him. i was also impressed by the support and warmth he gave students. for all his brilliance, keynes was a realist and one deeply concerned about the effects of economic theory on ever
world war, a war that was started by germany. >> on february 13, 1945, britain's royal air force targeted dresden. with help from american bombers, the devastated the city, killing 25,000 people in just hours. much of the downtown area was destroyed along with industrial and military infrastructure. bombs were dropped indiscriminately and nearly everywhere to inflict maximum damage. copper bombing, a horrendous tactic now prohibited by the geneva convention. at a demonstration in the city center, thousands warned against forgetting about germany's nazi past which provoked the horrors of dresden, so the locals by locking arms to keep neo-nazis out of the memorial services. the city is morning in a loss of innocent german citizens, not the downfall of the third reich. >> ash wednesday is also a holiday for political junkies here in germany. every year, politicians use the occasion to fire up their base. in bavaria, the csu leader try to galvanize support ahead of this year's elections, criticizing peer steinbrueck 4 racking up billions in debt during his time as finance minister. s
number of politicians, from britain to germany. >> this is not just about speed. we have to get quicker, but we also have to get better. that is why we need a rapid response team to monitor this international market. >> german supermarkets have already pulled thousands of products off the shelves, and the scandal appears to be far from over. >> coming up, the latest round of protests in egypt, this time in favor of president morsi. >> but first, we will look at some other stories making news. venezuelan state television has released photos of hugo chavez, who is recovering from cancer treatment in cuba. these are the first images of the ailing president to be released in months. venezuela reelected him last year, but he has not yet been well enough. >> the german finance minister fills a post which has been vacant since the previous chief was fired for incompetence nine months ago. >> airport security workers have suspended a strike in two major german airports for the weekend. the strike's over higher pay have forced the cancellation of hundreds of flights. workers say they will resume
in the organization. britain, france and germany, all say they want an international law to prevent multinationals from avoiding millions of dollars in taxes. the issue has topped the agenda at a meeting of g20 finance leaders in moscow. >> g20 finance ministers arriving in moscow have set themselves an ambitious agenda, rewriting global tax laws first introduced nearly a century ago an attempt to tackle so-called profit shifting by big multinationals. leading the call for reform, britain's finance minister george osborne angered by tax avoidance by companies like google and amazon. >> we all want international businesses located in our countries and doing business in our countries and employing people in our countries and certainly britain wants to have one of the most competitive tax systems in the world but we want businesses to pay the taxes we set in our countries and that cannot be achieved by one country alone. >> there were demonstrations outside of starbucks in london when it was revealed the coffee giant pa
and hunting for an enemy which is everywhere and nowhere. >> of the insurgency in southern thailand. britain wants to be your partner of choice. that was the message which david cameron delivered in mumbai today. going to india, cameron is leading a delegation of more than 100 british c e zero's and investors to strengthen ties. the divide between rich and poor is one of the greatest in the world in mumbai. >> the competition for the most vibrant, noisy, an overcrowded city on earth, mumbai would be right up there. the contrasts and contradictions are striking. >> wow. a is 30-years old, businessman. they are thinking of upgrading. he went out on a test drive. >> the back and the front of this car looks the way it does with the lights. aside when they see you. that is a fantastic feeling to just accelerate. >> not everyone is able to live in mumbai's fast lane. all cities have their divisions between rich and poor. rarely do you see it in such an extreme form as you do in mumbai. there is no running water and sewage runs down the alleyway. this is nothing like as bad as it gets. one person d
year. a big drop has also been reported in france. britain is the one exception. sales have continued to recover from the economic crisis. in january, car sales in britain were up 11% on the previous year. european carmakers such as bmw and volkswagen are having to look further afield to china, the u.s., and brazil. sales to those markets are rising constantly, and german car makers especially see lots more potential in growth markets like latin america and asia. rising sales there are more than making up for falling sales in europe. >> champions league action kicks off in just a few moment time. bayern munich take on english club arsenal with the odds stacked firmly in favor of the germans. >> the team has not conceded a goal in competitive place since mid-december, but london is promising passion on the pitch as the gunners pursue their last chance in the season to end a trophy trout stretching all the way back to 2005. >> unlike bayern munich, and now only have the champions league title to play for. out of the cup and out of contention in the english premier league, they need a bi
and french soldiers. the credit rating agency moody's has stripped britain of its top aaa status. lower credit ratings can make it more expensive for governments to borrow money. moody's says the british economy is not looking good in the medium term but the government says it will stick to its program of spending cuts. >> i think this is a stark reminder of the debt problems that britain faces and the clearest possible warning to anyone who thinks we can run away from dealing with those problems. and far from weakening our resolve to deal with britain's debt it should redouble our resolve to deliver a plan that has cut the deficit by 25, delivered 1 million jobs but also of course delivered record low interest rates to many families. >> the economy is playing a central role in italy's election campaign. the main candidates have held their final rallies ahead of voteding on sunday. bers coni is making one more bid to be prime minister but the front runner is from the center left democratic party. the french foreign ministry says drug tainted horse meat may have entered the food chain. t
against it, notably britain's -- britons, say that it will drive talent out of europe. >> the talks took more than 10 months. negotiators managed to clinch the deal despite opposition from the uk. at present, bankers can receive bonuses of as much as 20 times their basic salary. under the new rules, which can come into effect next year, they could be -- capped at one year's salary. >> most important thing is that banks will be stabilized, that a are better able to withstand the crisis -- that they are better able to withstand the crisis. >> it shows we are implementing what we learned from the financial crisis. >> critics say bonuses can encourage bankers to take unjustifiable risks in order to make more money. some say such behavior caused the financial and banking crisis. from now on, banks will also have to hold more capital as a buffer against any future crisis, a move intended to increase stability. germany also wants to increase -- introduce more regulations for the financial industry, including a law aimed at limiting the risks associated with high-speed trading. crick's say such
not be complete without a taste of britain's most popular drink. and who better to teach me about the tradition than cnn's very own richard quest. >> how do we hold our cup? >> i'll hold it like you do. >> well, okay. go ahead. you take the handle like that. you don't have to have the pinky up. >> you don't? i've been doing that for years. >> you may well have been, but it's not part of the routine. we have this wonderful phrase. we haven't even had a scone yet. aah. that's the phrase. a nice cup of tea. and when you say that phrase, a nice cup of tea, you are company noting more than just drink. you're often hear people say i could murder a nice cup of tea. noting more than just drink. you're often hear people say i could murder a nice cup of tea. important thing to remember about afternoon tea is that it's not just about the sandwiches or the tea or the scones. it's about the occasion. and the nooers earsest animaaloe brunch. if i invite you to brunch, we both know that we'll have eggs and something, a muffin. but that's not what it's about. it's about that moment, that sense of occasion. so
continues, see how britain is using new technology to tackle its age old pound puppy problem. >> but first too, close for comfort. see what happens when a whale decides to join a boating excursion off the >>> a trip in a canoe off the coast of hawaii turned into a whale watching excursion by surprise. a humpback whale came out of nowhere and nearly capsized the canoe that carried to people. the couple from arizona was not injured and they say the whale didn't appear to be injured as it swam away. >>> an amazing robotic reproduction of the human body is now on display at london's science museum. robotics experts have built what they've dubbed a million dollar bionic man deplete with artificial organs, synthetic blood, and robotic limbs. he's 6'6" and he was put together during the momently titled documentary "how to build a bionic man." his synthetic blood that we mentioned can bind and give off oxygen just like the real thing. the man called rex by his creators also has an artificial trachea, which means that he soon may be able to speak. >>> many cities north of us are bracing for what co
should not be used to compensate defense cuts. of all the countries to give foreign aid, britain currently sits at no. 3. david cameron has pledged to protect the national income that britain has promised to spend on development. this would equate to $16 billion in 2015, money that may now be used on defense. with me now is our national development correspondent. mark, you know these stories and have traveled around africa where they happen. your initial reaction? >> traditional workers are outraged at the idea that money is earmarked for aid and should now be spent on this project. but there is an overlap here. the classic example would be sierra leone, where the british army in the year 2000 proceeded to retrain the sierra leone army. the thinking was that there simply could not be any meaningful development unless there was security. that retraining of that army was a resounding success, actually. the army and police force that were put in place have partly led to them attracting a very large amount of foreign investment, building lots of new roads and so on. it is a success s
in the meat. >> stores in britain, france and sweden now yanking beef products off the shelves over a horse meat scare. >> burger king admits some of its patties in england and ireland were tainted with horse meat. >> stephen: someone in europe is trying to slip you their tainted meat, and for once it's not silvio burlesconi. [laughter] he has been known to yank his meat off the shelves: 4r5 h- [laughter] now, everyone in europe is worried that they may be biting down on horse, instead of their usual delicacy of pickled sheep brain. [laughter] it's a complex story, so let me back up and explain how this horse scandal went down. [speaking like a racetrack announcer] and they're off -- first, horse meat was discovered in a british supermarket, but britain rounded the bend and laid the blame on the irish supplier-- who said they got it from poland. poland denies it. aaaannnd here's france, coming up strong with their own horse meat scandal, selling meat to england and sweden, but france falls behind and lays the blame on cyprus. cyprus now in the lead with the blame, but what's this? what's t
are coming here? >> i think my honorable friend makes a very important point. britain has always been an open and welcoming economy, but it isn't right if our systems are being abused and that is why i shared it yesterday a committee meeting in whitehall which my right honorable friend from the member, the minister for immigration isn't leaving or we will look at every single one of our systems, housing, health, benefits. and make sure that we're not a soft touch for those who want to come here. i think it is vital that we get this right. there are many parts of our current arrangement which simply don't pass a simple common sense test in terms of access to housing, access to health service, access to justice and other things which should be the right of all britain citizen but they're not the right of anyone who just chooses to come here. >> if the prime minister is serious about tackling the serious problem of this labeling and the contamination of product, what possible future is there for the future of this coalition? [laughter] >> the coalition must be clearly labeled at all points to a
? >> i think my honorable friend makes a very important point. britain has always been an open and welcoming economy, but it isn't right if our systems are being abused and that is y i shared it yesterday a committee meeting in whitehall which my right honorable friend from the member, the minister for immigration isn't leaving or we will lok at very single one of our systems, housing, health, benefits. and make sure that we're not a soft touch for those who want to come here. i think it is vital that we gt this right. there are many parts of our current arrangement which simply don't pass a simple common sense test in terms of access to housing, access to health service, access to justice and other things which should be the right of all britain citizen but they're not the right of anyone who just chooses to come here. >> if the prime minister is serious about tackling the serious problem of thi labeling and the contamination of product, what possible future is there for the future of this coalition? [laughter] >> the coalition must be clearly labeled at all points to a buddy
, safeguarding britain's credit rating was the very first of his and i quote, benchmarks for britain, against which the bridge people can judge the economic success or failure of the next government. so does the prime minister except that by the first test he set himself he has failed? >> if there is a problem of excessive borrowing, why is it his policy to borrow more? that is the question he simply has to answer. if you want to listen to the credit rating agency, moody's say this. moody's can also downgraded the uk's government debt rating further in the event of reduced political commitment to fiscal consolidation. now on this side of the house we know that is a vital work we have to do. will he finally now admit that he is in favor of more borrowing? admit it. >> at militant. >> you always know when he starts asking me questions that he can't answer questions about his own record. the part-time chancellor said he would be a humiliation for britain to lose its aaa credit rating. now, mr. speaker. i know the prime minister is not big on humility. by his manifesto, but his manifesto did prom
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 812 (some duplicates have been removed)